Devilish Eggsellence

From Ancient Rome to contemporary Super Bowl cookouts, we’ve quite possibly indulged in these sinful samplers since the beginning of time.



Who can't love the fluffy finger food goodness that is the deviled egg? From Ancient Rome to contemporary Super Bowl cookouts, we’ve  quite possibly indulged in these sinful samplers since the beginning of time. While the earliest recipes are said to originate from the Andalusia region of modern-day Spain, variations were consumed across the European continent and filled with everything from raisins to anchovies. Traditionally served with spices, they procured their present and best-known moniker in18th century  America, where the term “deviled” was a common adjective applied to highly-seasoned snacks. 

Despite the seemingly traditional nature engrained in most, variety has long defined the deviled egg in all its incarnations. Manhattan's trendy Blue Smoke and Jazz Standard offers yet another twist on these time-honored hors d’ouvres:

Blue Smoke's Deviled Eggs

10 hard-boiled eggs
1 teaspoon Champagne vinegar
1/2 teaspoon of Coleman's Dry Mustard powder
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
7 tablespoons mayonnaise
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Salt & pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon curry powder (optional)

Gently crack the shells of the hard-boiled eggs and peel them under cool running water. Cut a small sliver off of the ends of each egg, so that it will sit on a plate, then slice in half, length-wise. Remove the firm yolk, setting the whites aside.  Blend the yolks in a food processor until smooth. Add remaining ingredients and blend until thoroughly mixed. Pipe or spoon mixture into egg white "cups" and refrigerate until served. Makes 20 deviled eggs.

Also See: Throw a Mad Men Cocktail Party

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