The Everything Guide to the Corkscrew

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Is Cork Endangered?

Corks come from the tree of the same name, so it’s logical to assume that with every bottle you buy, you’re slowly slashing away forests with 1¾-inch whacks. Happily, nothing could be further from the truth. That’s because cork is harvested only from the bark, which regenerates quickly. (These towering giants can live as long as 400 years.) According to the World Wildlife Fund, trees that have the bark removed can absorb five times more carbon dioxide than trees with the bark intact. And the 6.6 million acres of cork trees—spread mostly throughout Portugal, Spain, Morocco, Tunisia, Italy and France—supports the highest diversity of plants anywhere on earth. Put another way, every time you pop a real cork, you’re helping the environment. 

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The Everything Guide to the Corkscrew

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