Leftover Thanksgiving Fried Rice

At New York City restaurants Quality Italian and Quality Meats, Executive Chef Craig Koketsu serves fun, innovative twists on steakhouse classics alongside extensive wine lists. His newest restaurant, Quality Eats in Manhattan’s West Village, opened November 2015 but Koketsu took the time to give us this smart alternative for Thanksgiving leftovers. 

Recipe courtesy Craig Koketsu, executive chef, Quality Eats, Quality Italian and Quality Meats, New York City

Ingredients
  • 8 slices thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into ¼-inch strips
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cup finely chopped mushrooms
  • 2 cups turkey (preferably dark meat), cut into ½-inch pieces
  • 3 cups cooked rice, preferably short-grain Japanese or sushi rice, cooled 
  • 2 cups turkey stuffing (if moist, dry in a 300˚F oven until crumbly)
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • ½ cup gravy
  • 2 eggs, beaten 
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt (optional)
  • 1 bunch scallions, finely chopped (green and white parts)
  • Cranberry sauce (optional)
Directions

In a large, well-seasoned cast iron or heavy nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, cook bacon until almost crisp and fat is rendered. Add onions and mushrooms. Cook until onions are translucent and sweet. Add turkey, rice and stuffing, mixing to ensure everything is coated with bacon fat. Let rice crisp a little at the bottom of pan. Add soy sauce and gravy, mixing well into rice. In another pan, cook eggs until softly scrambled. Fold eggs into rice. Season generously with pepper, and add salt, if necessary. Just before serving, mix in chopped scallions. Serve with cranberry sauce, if desired. Serves 6.

Pair It

 Guy Breton 2013 Régnié

“Cru Beaujolais are often my picks to accompany Thanksgiving meals, lying somewhere in between jammy Zinfandel and cherry-packed, lighter-styled Pinot Noir,” says Marc Passer, wine director at Quality Eats. “Guy Breton’s wines from Régnié are more gripping than Pinot Noir, with polished tannins and ripe strawberry and cranberry on the palate.”

Published on December 8, 2015
About the Author
Nils Bernstein
Contributing Editor, Food

A fan of sweet wines, sour beers, and old-school Rioja, Bernstein is an exhaustive traveler in search of new and unsung chefs and restaurants, innovative wine and food pairings, and eating and drinking at the source. In addition to Wine Enthusiast, Bernstein has written for Bon Appetit, Men’s Journal, New York Times, Men’s Fitness, Hemispheres, and Kinfolk, among others.

Email: nbernstein@wineenthusiast.net



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