The New York Flip

As egg white cocktails continue their unstoppable march across cocktail menus everywhere, it’s time to look at the other half of the ingredient: the yolk.
Getty

The New York Flip is just one member of an entire class of classic cocktails called flips. Though there are historical claims of flips being created as far back as the 1600s, modern understanding of the drink stems—as do a vast number of cocktails we enjoy today—from Jerry Thomas’ seminal 1862 bar bible, How to Mix Drinks: or, The Bon-Vivant’s Companion.

By itself, a flip just means a cocktail made with egg and sugar, but traditionally without cream (differentiating it from an eggnog). What sets a flip apart from other egg cocktails is that the whole egg is used, yolk included. Many classic recipes even call for twice as much egg yolk as egg white. The word “flip” itself comes from the old practice of pouring the egged mix back and forth rapidly between jugs to froth the cocktail and smoothen out the drink.

The Brooklyn

The tawny Port acts as the primary sweetening agent in the New York Flip, bolstered with just a small amount of simple syrup. And because New Yorkers have to be brash, their signature version of the flip has also come to include the addition of cream and egg yolk without the white. Swap the heavy cream with buttermilk for a nice variation that has less fat but a touch more acid, to counter the richness of the drink.

Though it falls more in line with the nog family, however you choose to prepare it, keep this classic recipe in your pocket for a perfect after-dinner drink.

Ingredients
  • 1 ½ ounces Bourbon
  • ¾ ounce tawny Port
  • ¼ ounce simple syrup
  • ¾ ounce heavy cream or buttermilk
  • 1 egg yolk
  • Nutmeg, for garnish
Directions

Combine all ingredients except for garnish in a cocktail shaker. Dry shake (vigorously and without ice) for at least 20 seconds, or until egg is fully beaten and incorporated into the drink. Add ice and shake again for an additional 10–15 seconds to chill. Strain into a sherry glass, coupe or martini glass and grate fresh nutmeg over the top. Serve up.

Published on September 27, 2016
About the Author
Dylan Garret
Associate Digital Editor

A veteran of New York City’s bar and restaurant scene, Garret has lived, breathed and sweated spirits for more than a decade, working as a bartender and beverage director at establishments ranging from Michelin-starred eateries to local Brooklyn pubs. Joining Wine Enthusiast in 2015, he has very strong opinions on proper cocktail garnish.
Email: dgarret@wineenthusiast.net
Instagram: @dillinisillin



SUBSCRIBE TO
NEWSLETTERS
The latest wine reviews, trends and recipes plus special offers on wine storage and accessories