Turchetta

Turkey takes to slow roasting, and a deboned bird is a great stand-in for porchetta, the traditional pork roast. Get light and dark meat in every bite.
Photo by Penny De Los Santos

Courtesy Jose Guerrero, ViewHouse Eatery, Bar & Rooftop, Denver

Turkey takes to the same slow roasting that makes for moist porchetta, and a deboned bird is a great stand-in for the traditional pork roast. The vivid spice mixture (you can add minced giblets, if you’re a fan) perks up the sometimes-bland meat, and you get light and dark meat in every bite.

Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons fennel seeds
  • 2½ tablespoons coarsely ground Aleppo pepper (or stemmed and seeded Urfa, ancho or New Mexico chili peppers)
  • 4 tablespoons fresh sage, minced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, minced
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 12-pound turkey, deboned (ask butcher to do this for you)
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
Directions

In large skillet over medium heat, stir all ingredients except turkey and salt just until aromatic, about 2 minutes. Set aside.

On cutting board, lay turkey skin-side down. If necessary, trim edges and surface to create uniform shape and thickness. Mince trimmed bits of skin and meat, and add to herb mixture.

With mallet or rolling pin, lightly pound turkey to flatten evenly. Using fork, poke holes all over the surface. Season with salt, and spread herb mixture down center.

Roll turkey into tight cylinder, and tie with kitchen twine. Salt skin, and place on wire rack in baking pan. Let dry in the refrigerator from 1–24 hours.

Preheat oven to 425˚F. Cook for 1 hour, then reduce heat to 325˚F. Cook until internal temperature reaches 160˚F using meat thermometer, about 90 minutes. Let rest 20–40 minutes before slicing. Drizzle with juices from pan.

Wine Pairing

Infinite Monkey Theorem 2014 Cabernet Franc (Grand Valley)

“Infinite Monkey Theorem is down the street from ViewHouse and offers a dynamic Cab Franc, uniquely crafted from their urban ‘back-alley winery,’ ” says Guerrero. “Covering the palate with subtle fruit and spice aromas, this Colorado wine offers robust acidity, which cuts perfectly through the turkey’s richness.”

Published on November 15, 2016
About the Author
Nils Bernstein
Contributing Editor, Food

A fan of sweet wines, sour beers, and old-school Rioja, Bernstein is an exhaustive traveler in search of new and unsung chefs and restaurants, innovative wine and food pairings, and eating and drinking at the source. In addition to Wine Enthusiast, Bernstein has written for Bon Appetit, Men’s Journal, New York Times, Men’s Fitness, Hemispheres, and Kinfolk, among others.

Email: nbernstein@wineenthusiast.net



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