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Saganaki

Description

Every Greek restaurant from Athens to Chicago has a version of fried, flaming cheese—the ubiquitous saganaki. But many people mistakenly believe that saganaki refers to the kind of cheese used in the dish. It doesn’t. Saganaki is actually the name of the heavy pan in which the cheese is cooked. Which cheese then? More confusion. Greek chefs make saganaki with lots of different kinds—the main criterion being that they're firm enough to stay intact after meltdown. Kefalotyri, Kasseri, and the Cypriot cheese Haloumi are often recommended. . .but I recently found a better choice out there. It's Formaela, available at Titan Foods, in Astoria, Queens. In a recent test, it had the sexiest melt, becoming almost runny, but still held together perfectly. It had the softest texture in the mouth; it developed the crunchiest exterior, with a gorgeous golden-brown color, and the best cheesy cheese-gratin kind of flavor. It also had just enough salt to satisfy, you could eat tons of it, and it was the best one with ouzo.

Cuisine
Vegetarian
Source
Recipe courtesy of David Rosengarten
Ingredients
Greek chefs make saganaki with lots of different kinds—the main criterion being that they're firm enough to stay intact after meltdown. Kefalotyri, Kasseri, and the Cypriot cheese Haloumi are often recommended. . .but I recently found a better choice out there. It's Formaela, available at Titan Foods, in Astoria, Queens.
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