Wine & Ratings


About Bonarda

Bonarda is one of those grapes that prompts much confusion in consumers and experts alike. In northern Italy's region of Piedmont, Bonarda goes by the name Bonarda Piemontese and is believed to be the original form of the grape. In its Piedmont form, it is often blended with Nebbiolo and Croatina to create the DOCG wines Gattinara and Ghemme. In Argentina, Bonarda is also produced and is second to Malbec in the country's vineyard acreage. However, Argentinian Bonarda's roots remain uncertain. There are theories that Argentinian Bonarda is actually California's Charbono, which in turn could be related to Italy's Dolcetto. When vinified, Argentinian Bonarda can produce a range of styles. It can be a light-bodied wine with cherry and plum flavors, light tannins and moderate acidity; or, if produced from old vines, it can be full bodied with dense tannins, a prune-like concentration and oak tones. To find out more about Bonarda, be sure to check out our Bonarda Buying Guide.