Moscato d’Asti is Ripe for Aging

Often consumed young, an Italian producer is proving that Moscato d'Asti is capable of aging for a decade or more.
Photo by Meg Baggott

Fragrant, foaming, fresh and delicious, Moscato d’Asti is one of Italy’s most celebrated sweet wines. This silky, low-alcohol sparkler is made entirely from white Muscat grapes, and its typical sensations include orange blossom, apricot, thyme and lemon. It’s generally consumed upon release, but its bright acidity means it can have serious aging potential when stored in the right conditions.

There aren’t many examples of aged Moscato d’Asti on the market, but a unique tasting of Saracco gives an idea of what this wine might have in store. Get ahead of the curve and tuck away a bottle during this year’s holiday celebrations.

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What to Expect

Moscato producer Saracco sent Italian Editor Kerin O’Keefe an exclusive lineup of vintages back to 2005. Here’s how they evolved.

2016

Juicy with a silky mousse, this has aromas and flavors of wildflower, ripe apricot and chopped herb. Textbook.

2015

Fresh, fragrant and savory, this boasts classic apricot, citrus and Mediterranean herb sensations. It’s creamy and elegant, with a lemon drop finish.

2014

Floral and eucalyptus aromas lead the nose, while the vibrant, elegant palate offers ripe apricot, nectarine and a hint of graphite.

2013

More deeply colored, this has dried apricot, pinesap and aromatic herb sensations.

2012

Boasting intense thyme, dried apricot, orange zest, lemon drop and cedar sensations, this is still fresh, but it’s gaining depth.

2011

Remarkably fresh and polished, this presents youthful orange blossom, lime, yellow peach and wild herb sensations. It closes on a graphite note.

2010

Golden colored, this has complexity, freshness and finesse. It delivers crushed mint, lime, orange zest, rosemary and kerosene sensations. Gorgeous.

2009

Deeply colored, this has balsamic aromas of camphor, thyme and kerosene. The palate is fresher, with tangy orange, apricot and a nutty finish.

2008

Deep yellow hue, but still so fresh. This has a stunning depth of flavors, including hazelnut, dried herb, ripe yellow peach, white grapefruit and mineral, alongside juicy acidity.

2007

No longer sparkling, this is more like a vino da meditazione (an Italian phrase that can describe sweet wines to linger over). It offers candied lemon drop, honeyed almond and dried apricot flavors.

2006

Camphor, thyme, peach and lime aromas shape the nose. Polished smooth, the elegant, savory palate is almost still. It delivers dried apricot, lemon pastry cream and mineral alongside fresh acidity.

2005

Deeply colored and no longer sparkling, this has fresh acidity that brightens candied lemon, ripe apricot and balsamic herb. Flinty mineral and honey notes linger on the finish.

Published on October 31, 2018
Topics: Wine Ratings
About the Author
Kerin O’Keefe
Italian Editor

Reviews wines from Italy

Italian Editor Kerin O’Keefe reviews all Italian wines for Wine Enthusiast. Previously she wrote regularly on Italian wine for Wine News, World of Fine Wine and Decanter. She is the author of Franco Biondi Santi: The Gentleman of Brunello (2005), Brunello di Montalcino: Understanding and Appreciating One of Italy's Greatest Wines (2012) and Barolo and Barbaresco: The King and Queen of Italian Wine (2014).

Email: kokeefe@wineenthusiast.net.




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