The Best Stadiums for Gourmands

Sip and sup at these next-level stadium eateries while cheering on your favorite team.

Some stadiums have stepped their culinary game up beyond the quintessential ballpark frank. If you find yourself in a position to catch a game at any of these four legendary venues, these are the dishes you need to try.

  1. 1

    AAMI Park, Melbourne, Australia

    Home to the Melbourne Storm (rugby) and Melbourne Victory (soccer), this architecturally fantastic rectangular stadium with a bioframe roof is a marvel. Locals hit Edwin’s Cafe on the ground level for batter-fried Australian flathead tails with fat chips and lemon aioli.

  2. 2

    Levi’s Stadium, Santa Clara, California

    Home field of the San Francisco 49ers and the recent Super Bowl 50, great food and drink abound here. Locals head to the suite level for the grilled Castroville artichokes, served with charred lemon, garlic aioli and  chives. The heirloom carrot cake with Mascarpone cream-cheese frosting is also stellar.

  3. 3

    Stade de France, Paris

    Home to soccer, rugby and big-name concerts, le Stade offers a selection of VIP seats and private boxes, in addition to the sleekly designed restaurant Salon Le{Club}, which offers panoramic view of the stadium. Champagne, wine and spirits complement the food orchestrated by Chef Guy Krenzer. Recent entrées included chicken viennoise confit with a vegetable tart, followed by dessert: black pepper-infused roasted apricots served with a warm madeleine and ice cream.

  4. 4

    All England Lawn Tennis Club, London

    During the summer fortnight of Wimbledon, The Wingfield Restaurant (reservations required) is worth a visit for the view alone. It’s located on the first floor of the Centre Court Building, above the great tennis town’s Tea Lawn. You’ll be turned away if deemed too casual (no jeans). The food is appropriately English, with a main course of grainy mustard- and basil-glazed Shropshire sirloin that’s quite the ticket. A visit would not be right without an ending of Kentish strawberries and blackberries in Cornish-clotted cream.

Published on March 23, 2016
Topics: Sports + Wine, Travel Destinations, Travel Guides
About the Author
Virginie Boone
Contributing Editor

Reviews wines from California.

Contributing Editor Virginie Boone has been with Wine Enthusiast since 2010, and reviews the wines of Napa and Sonoma. Boone began her writing career with Lonely Planet travel guides, which eventually led to California-focused wine coverage. She contributes to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat and Sonoma Magazine, and is a regular panelist and speaker on wine topics in California and beyond. Email: vboone@wineenthusiast.net


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