28-Day, Dry-Aged Ribeye Steak With Pureed Potatoes

28-day, dry-aged ribeye steak with pureed potatoes
Photo by Con Poulos / Food Styling by Mariana Velasquez

Adapted from Danny Grant, executive chef/partner, Maple & Ash, Chicago

Steak is the star at upscale Chicago eatery Maple & Ash, but you’ll receive the accolades when you whip up Danny Grant’s ribeye at home. Seared beef may be a heavy choice for a romantic dinner, so you can save leftovers for a hearty steak and eggs breakfast in bed. This meal channels a mix of cozy simplicity—it’s just steak and potatoes—and extreme opulence. Indulge in this lavish dinner if your idea of a romantic evening is pure creature comfort.

Three Meals Perfect for Valentine's Day Dinner

 

Dry-Aged Ribeye Steak Ingredients
  • 20- to 24-ounce dry-aged boneless ribeye (approximately 1¼ inches thick)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1½ tablespoons butter
  • Potato purée (recipe below)
Dry-Aged Ribeye Steak Directions

Place oven rack in second-highest position, and set broiler on high. Season steak with salt and pepper on both sides. Warm large cast-iron pan over stovetop burner on high until hot. Place steak in pan, and transfer to oven. Broil for 4–5 minutes.

Flip steak, top with ½ tablespoon butter, and broil for 4–5 minutes, or until internal temperature is 135˚F for medium-rare. Remove from oven, and top with ½ tablespoon butter. Let rest for 5 minutes.

Add remaining butter. Slice steak, and divide between two plates. Serve with potato purée. Serves 2.

Potato Purée Ingredients and Directions

Place 3 medium potatoes, peeled and medium-diced, in medium stockpot. Cover with salted water, and boil until tender. Drain and transfer to stand mixer. Run mixer, and add ½ cup warmed heavy cream, ¼ cup melted butter and ⅛ teaspoon salt. Mix until creamy and smooth. Serve while hot.

Pair It

Amy Mundwiler, wine director at Maple & Ash and its downstairs sibling lounge, 8 Bar, suggests Paolo Scavino 2014 Monvigliero Barolo. “While this sumptuous Barolo will age well for several more years, its velvety tannins are a nice antidote to the well-marbled fat in the ribeye and the creaminess of the potatoes. Meanwhile, the toothy steak will not overpower the bright strawberry, cherry and spice flavors of the wine.”

Published on February 9, 2019
About the Author
Mike DeSimone and Jeff Jenssen
Entertaining and Lifestyle Editors

Mike DeSimone and Jeff Jenssen are Wine Enthusiast's Entertaining and Lifestyle Editors. DeSimone tastes wine from Israel and the Mediterranean Basin, while Jenssen tastes wine from Eastern Europe, including the former the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. Both co-authored Wines of California, Wines of the Southern Hemisphere, and The Fire Island Cookbook. Wine educators and presenters, both gentlemen serve as frequent guests on national and local television. Email: mikeandjeff@wineenthusiast.net



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