Apple Strudel Mille-Feuille Recipe

This reinterpreted version of classic German apple strudel utilizes puff pastry, walnuts and vanilla ice cream for an impressive, easy-to-make dessert.
Apple Strudel Mille-Feuille / Photo by Sang An

Courtesy Tim Schulte and David Mueller, co-executive chefs, Bauhaus Restaurant, Vancouver, BC

Bauhaus deconstructs a classic German apple strudel into a delicate, easy-to-assemble mille-feuille. At the restaurant, puff pastry and vanilla ice cream are made in-house, and the finished dessert is served with shavings of dried tonka bean, an aromatic legume that lends exotic whiffs of vanilla, dried fruits and cinnamon. Using store-bought ice cream and frozen puff pastry, this makes an impressive but quick dessert at home.

The New Global Face of German Cuisine
  • 1 package frozen puff pastry, defrosted
  • 2 pounds apples, peeled, cored and cut into ½-inch cubes
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon rum
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 1 vanilla bean, split and scraped
  • ¾ cup roasted walnuts
  • Ground cinnamon, to taste
  • Powdered sugar, to taste
  • Vanilla ice cream

Heat oven to 350˚F. On baking pan lined with parchment paper, unfold puff pastry sheets and cover each with second layer of parchment. Place additional baking pan on top to prevent pastry from rising.

Bake for 15–20 minutes, or until browned. Let cool. Using a sharp knife, cut 8 squares or circles 3 inches in diameter.

Reduce oven heat to 325˚F. In a large bowl, combine apples, sugar, lemon juice, rum, raisins, vanilla bean scrapings, walnuts and cinnamon. Spread mixture on separate sheet tray and bake for 10–15 minutes, or until apples soften. Let cool to room temperature.

Place 1–2 spoonfuls of apple mixture on top of 4 pastry pieces. Top each with second layer of pastry. Dust with powdered sugar. Serve with ice cream. Serves 4.

Pair It

Selbach-Oster 2015 Zeltinger Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese (Mosel). For this sweetly spiced dessert, Klintworth recommends this late-harvest Riesling from the Mosel. With beautiful honey and dried apricot notes, and a refreshingly acidic finish, it’s “a master piece of German sweet wine,” he says.

Published on January 9, 2018
About the Author
Anna Lee C. Iijima
Contributing Editor

Reviews wines from Germany and the Rhône Valley

Anna Lee C. Iijima joined Wine Enthusiast in 2010. A former attorney turned beverage devotee, she holds a Diploma in Wine and Spirits from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust and is a student in the Masters of Wine Program. She is also an Advanced Sake Professional of the Sake Education Council with an enduring love for saké and shochu.


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