Creole Eggnog

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Recipe courtesy Lisa White, baker, Willa Jean, New Orleans

When it comes to eggs, fresh is usually best. But this holiday season, you may find aged eggnog in your cup. A growing number of bartenders are experimenting with aging eggnog for months, or even years.

At Willa Jean in New Orleans, baker Lisa White offers a rich, creamy Creole Eggnog, which sits in the refrigerator for three months before serving. “It’s similar to baking,” says White, who frequently dabbles with limoncellos and other DIY liqueurs. “You have to make it, and then you wait.”

She likens her version to zabaglione, a custard-like Italian dessert. It’s made with cooked eggs and sugar, cold-brew coffee, orange zest and spices, plus plenty of Bourbon, applejack and pecan liqueur. She stores it in a refrigerator and whisks the mixture daily. Eventually, the alcohol mellows and the eggnog thickens to a luxurious, velvety consistency.

Would You Drink Old Egg Nog?
Ingredients
  • 7 pasteurized whole eggs
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup dark brown sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground mace
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¾ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • ¾ teaspoon freshly ground cinnamon stick
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract
  • ¼ teaspoon Angostura bitters
  • ¼ cup Four Roses Bourbon
  • ¾ cup Bayou Spiced Rum
  • ¾ cup Rivulet Pecan Liqueur
  • ¾ cup applejack
  • ¾ gallon half and half
  • ¼ cup cold-brew coffee
  • Peel from ½ of an orange, zested or cut into strips
Directions

Place whole eggs and sugars into a mixer with a whisk attachment. Mix for approximately 10 minutes, or until it thickens slightly. Scrape mixture into a large bowl.

Whisk spices into mixture, followed by bitters and alcohol. Add half and half and coffee, continuing to whisk slowly. When finished, drop in the orange zest. Cover the bowl tightly and store in the refrigerator.

Shake or stir the containers daily for 30 days. The mixture will mellow and become creamier as it ages.

After 30 days, strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve and serve.

Published on January 3, 2017
About the Author
Kara Newman 
Spirits Editor

Kara Newman reviews spirits and writes about spirits and cocktail trends for Wine Enthusiast. She's the author of Shake.Stir.Sip.: 40 Effortless Cocktails Made In Equal Parts (Chronicle Books, 2016) as well as ROAD SODA: Recipes and techniques for making great cocktails, anywhere (Dovetail Press, 2017). Email: spirits@wineenthusiast.net



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