Dutch Baby Pancakes

Made in a cast iron skillet, this Dutch baby pancake is sweet, but feel free to omit the sugar and add sautéed vegetables or meat for a more savory dish.
The Dutch baby pancake / Photo by Sang An

Courtesy Carolynn Spence, executive chef, Shaker + Spear, Seattle

At Shaker + Spear, Spence serves refined comfort food that’s largely sourced from just around the block at Pike Place Market. The Dutch baby pancake is believed to have been invented in Seattle, inspired by the German pfannkuchen.

Spence serves this slightly sweet version, as well as a savory take cloaked in a sausage ragù. To make your own savory baby, eliminate the sugar and add any combination of sautéed vegetables, meat and/or cheese to the batter before baking. A cast-iron skillet is both practical and attractive, but any ovenproof skillet or high-sided glass dish, like a pie plate, will also work.

Four Easy Ways to Make Breakfast for Dinner
Ingredients
  • 3 eggs, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup milk
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ cup flour
  • Pinch grated nutmeg, optional
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Powdered sugar and lemon wedges, for garnish
Directions

Whisk together first 8 ingredients very well, or combine in blender. Let rest at least 30 minutes, or refrigerate up to 24 hours. If refrigerating, return to room temperature before cooking.

Heat oven to 450˚F. Warm 9-inch cast-iron skillet in oven at least 15 minutes. Add butter to pan, and swirl quickly to coat. Pour batter in center of pan and quickly return to oven. Cook for 15 minutes, until pancake is golden brown and has risen high. Garnish with powdered sugar dusted atop and lemon wedges alongside. Serve immediately. Serves 2.

Pair It

àMaurice 2016 Sparrow Estate Viognier (Walla Walla Valley). “This is round on the palate with a delightful acidity that yearns for food,” says Ryan Steele, general manager at Shaker + Spear. “The Dutch Baby pairs amazing with the ‘Sparrow,’ especially with lemon and powdered sugar. The acidity cuts through the sugar to highlight wildflower notes, while the wine’s roundness stands up to the density of the Dutch Baby.”

Published on December 15, 2018
About the Author
Nils Bernstein
Contributing Editor, Food

A fan of sweet wines, sour beers, and old-school Rioja, Bernstein is an exhaustive traveler in search of new and unsung chefs and restaurants, innovative wine and food pairings, and eating and drinking at the source. In addition to Wine Enthusiast, Bernstein has written for Bon Appetit, Men’s Journal, New York Times, Men’s Fitness, Hemispheres, and Kinfolk, among others.

Email: nbernstein@wineenthusiast.net



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