Entrecôte Bordelaise

Cooked rare steak on a wooden cutting board
Entrecôte Bordelaise / Photo by Morgan Ione Photography, Food Styling by Judy Haubert

Entrecôte is a boneless ribeye steak that’s cut thin for quick cooking. You can purchase a 1½-inch-thick steak and halve it into thinner steaks yourself, or ask your butcher to do it. Bordelaise sauce is a classic that’s often made with bone marrow to thicken it to a gravy-like consistency. This recipe is thickened instead with beurre manié, a mixture of butter and flour that adds almost as much richness as marrow, but with ingredients you’re likely to have on hand.

The Best Cabernet Pairings for Different Types of Steak
Ingredients
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • Salt and pepper
  • 4 (8-ounce, ¾-inch-thick) entrecôte steaks
Directions

In small saucepan, combine wine, shallots and thyme. Bring to simmer over medium-low heat and continue simmering until wine is reduced by half.

Meanwhile, in small bowl or ramekin, mash together 1 tablespoon of butter and flour with fork or back of spoon until thoroughly integrated.

Once wine is reduced, add beef stock and simmer until reduced by about one third. Pinch off small ball of flour mixture and whisk it into sauce. Repeat, leaving about 30 seconds between additions, until sauce is thick enough to coat back of spoon. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

In large, heavy skillet, preferably cast iron, heat remaining 1 tablespoon of butter over medium-high heat. Season steaks with salt and pepper and add to pan (you may need to work in two batches). Increase heat to high. Cook until steak’s browned on one side, 3–4 minutes. Turn over. Cook until browned on other side, another 3–4 minutes. Internal temperature should be 125˚F, or medium rare, but if not, flip again and cook until desired doneness. Remove from pan and let sit for 5–10 minutes. Slice across grain and top with sauce. Serves 4.

Wine Pairing

Château la Tonnelle 2016 Haut-Médoc; $17, 91 points. This stylish wine displays good balance between ripe black-currant fruits and tannins. With 60% Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend, the wine has a good structure that will allow it to age. Drink from 2022. Editors’ Choice. –Roger Voss

Published on September 13, 2019
About the Author
Layla Schlack
Senior Editor

Schlack has written and edited stories about cooking, dining, spirits, entertaining and travel, as well as developed recipes, in various editorial roles at Fine Cooking and Hemispheres. Her writing has won a NATJA award. When she’s not editing Wine Enthusiast’s food, spirits and entertaining stories, she can usually be found clanging around her Connecticut kitchen, beverage in hand, trying to re-create some tasty meal she’s had over the course of her travels. Email: lschlack@wineenthusiast.net



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