Farsumagru (Rolled, Stuffed Beef)

This Sicilian beef-and-pork dish makes for a hearty main course, and also gives you a good use for any open red wine you have that's past its prime.
Photo by Aaron Graubart

Adapted from Flavors of Sicily, by Ursula Ferrigno (Ryland Peters & Small, 2016)

The name of this dish translates to “fake lean,” though it’s plenty rich. Serve on its own as a main dish, or as part of a buffet.

Classic At-Home Sicilian Cooking Recipes
Ingredients
  • 6 ounces ground pork
  • ½ pound Italian-style pork sausage, casing removed
  • 1 onion, sliced and divided
  • 1¾ pounds boneless beef sirloin, cut into ¼-inch slices
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, sliced
  • 3 strips bacon
  • ¾ cup grated Pecorino cheese
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • Olive oil, for pan
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 2 cups beef or chicken stock
Directions

In large skillet over medium heat, sauté pork, sausage and ½ onion 10 minutes. Set aside.

Lay out beef slices on work surface, overlapping slightly, to make a 9-inch by 12-inch rectangle. Top slices with sausage mixture evenly. Add eggs, bacon, Pecorino and garlic. Season with salt and pepper. Roll up and tie with kitchen twine.

Coat deep skillet or Dutch oven (large enough to hold meat) with olive oil over medium heat. Add remaining onion. Add beef and brown very well on all sides. Transfer to plate. Add wine to pan, and scrape up browned bits. Cook until wine is almost evaporated. Return beef to pan. Add stock and reduce heat to low. Cook for 1 hour, turning occasionally.

Remove beef, and set aside. Boil sauce, if necessary, until it thickens like gravy. Serve in thick slices, warm or at room temperature, with a little pan sauce. Serves 4–6.

Directions

Biondi 2014 Outis Rosso (Etna); $40, 95 points. “Nerello Mascalese excels on the slopes of Mount Etna, yielding just the sort of savory, crisp, medium-tannin reds that pair well with this traditional dish,” says Nadel. “They have enough texture to complement the meat without clashing with the bold flavors of garlic and Pecorino.” This wine offers smoky and herbal notes, with polished tannins and fresh acidity in perfect balance.

Published on March 21, 2017
About the Author
Nils Bernstein
Contributing Editor, Food

A fan of sweet wines, sour beers, and old-school Rioja, Bernstein is an exhaustive traveler in search of new and unsung chefs and restaurants, innovative wine and food pairings, and eating and drinking at the source. In addition to Wine Enthusiast, Bernstein has written for Bon Appetit, Men’s Journal, New York Times, Men’s Fitness, Hemispheres, and Kinfolk, among others.

Email: nbernstein@wineenthusiast.net



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