Kansas City Strip

Still on the bone and with a nice rim of fat on the outside, the Kansas City strip is ideal for meat lovers, and perfect for pairing with Cabernet.
Kansas City strip / Photo by Con Poulos / Food styling by Barrett Washburne

Courtesy Joseph Rizza, executive chef, Prime & Provisions, Chicago

The Kansas City strip—with the bone in, a nice rim of fat on the outside and quality marbling throughout—is a meat lovers’ dream. At Prime & Provisions in Chicago, Executive Chef Joseph Rizza uses dry-aged steak for a more concentrated, meaty flavor. If your butcher dry ages in-house, you’re encouraged to follow Rizza’s lead. Bonus: This recipe will teach how to get that perfect crosshatch pattern on your meat.

The Best Ways to Pair Steak with Cabernet
Ingredients
  • 1 18-ounce Kansas City strip steak
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh-cracked black pepper
  • Olive oil
Directions

Approximately 30 minutes before cooking, remove steak from refrigerator. Let sit at room temperature.

Warm grill to maximum heat, 550–600˚F. Season steak evenly with salt and pepper on both sides. Brush grill grates with olive oil. Place steak on grill and lower heat slightly. Cook for 2 minutes, and then rotate 90˚ and cook for another 2 minutes. Flip steak, and cook for 2 minutes. Rotate 90˚ and cook until probe thermometer inserted into thickest part of steak registers 125˚F for medium rare. Remove steak from heat. Let rest 6–8 minutes. Serves 2.

Pair It

Chappellet 2015 Signature Cabernet Sauvignon (Napa Valley). “When pairing wine with steak, the answer is usually easy—big reds,” says Adam Sweders, head sommelier at Prime & Provisions. “But let’s analyze this a bit for a specific choice within that very broad spectrum. . .You’re best taking a fruit-forward approach with the wine, something with a ripened sense to tone down the spice. Be careful as to not go too ripe though, because you’ll slowly head into high-alcohol wines that will combat the spice. So, we head to the mountains of Napa. Slightly cooler, lower alcohol, still-ripened fruit. With the less-ripened fruit and mountain soils, a certain degree of the earth will be able to shine.”

Published on July 31, 2018
About the Author
Layla Schlack
Senior Editor

Schlack has written and edited stories about cooking, dining, spirits, entertaining and travel, as well as developed recipes, in various editorial roles at Fine Cooking and Hemispheres. Her writing has won a NATJA award. When she’s not editing Wine Enthusiast’s food, spirits and entertaining stories, she can usually be found clanging around her Connecticut kitchen, beverage in hand, trying to re-create some tasty meal she’s had over the course of her travels. Email: lschlack@wineenthusiast.net



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