Otho’s Brunchapuncha Cocktail

Think a French press is only good for coffee? This brunch cocktail uses the popular kitchen tool in new ways by incorporating vodka, cucumber and melon.
Photo by Meg Baggott

Courtesy Dylan Holcomb, bartender, Beatrice & Woodsley, Denver

If you have a French coffee press, break it out for this fresh, colorful punch. “Pressing down on the French press will bring out even more cucumber, cantaloupe and mint flavors, creating an even richer drink,” says Kevin Delk, owner of Denver’s woodland-inspired Beatrice & Woodsley. No press? No problem. You can build this bubbly libation in a pitcher.

Ingredients
  • 5 tablespoons sugar
  • 8 slices cucumber, divided (plus additional for garnish)
  • 8 cantaloupe balls; plus additional for garnish
  • 2–3 mint sprigs, plus additional mint leaves
  • 4 ounces vodka
  • 2 ounces ginger liqueur
  • 4 ounces fresh-squeezed lemon juice
  • Prosecco, to top
Directions

Combine sugar with 5 tablespoons water in saucepan over medium heat, and cook until dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Put 4 slices of cucumber, 4 cantaloupe balls, the mint sprigs and ice in large French press or pitcher. Set aside.

In cocktail shaker, muddle remaining cucumber slices, cantaloupe balls and mint leaves. Add the vodka, ginger liqueur, simple syrup, lemon juice and ice. Shake well, and strain into the French press or pitcher. Top with Prosecco.

Pour into Collins glasses (if using a French press, you may need to scoop additional ice into each glass first). Garnish each drink with a cucumber slice and melon ball. Serves 6.

Brunch Facts: British Brunching

• The tradition of a late-morning meal began during the late 1800s in the United Kingdom as the “hunt breakfast,” according to Farha Ternikar’s book, Brunch: A History (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014). Following an early-morning hunt, servants would prepare a feast of meats caught that day for the hunting party, resulting in a later-than-usual eating time.

• The word “brunch” first appeared in print in an 1895 article in Hunter’s Weekly. In “Brunch: A Plea,” British author Guy Beringer wrote: “Brunch is cheerful, sociable and inciting. It is talk compelling. It puts you in a good temper, it makes you satisfied with yourself and your fellow beings, it sweeps away the worries and cobwebs of the week.

Published on April 14, 2017
About the Author
Kara Newman 
Spirits Editor

Kara Newman reviews spirits and writes about spirits and cocktail trends for Wine Enthusiast. She's the author of several cocktail books, including Shake.Stir.Sip. and NIGHTCAP: More than 40 Cocktails to Close Out Any Evening, which debuts in September 2018. Email: spirits@wineenthusiast.net



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